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Snakes and monkeys cause driver concern 10/12/2018

Snakes and monkeys proved to be one of the top concerns for a foreign driver set to take to the UK’s roads.

The concern, expressed by a southeast Asia driver, was raised during one of Licence Bureau’s new online training courses for fleets – MyUK – designed to help foreign drivers stay safe on UK roads.

"I couldn’t quite believe what I was hearing when they asked how we manage snakes and monkeys on the roads here in the UK. It certainly raised a smile and provided some light relief from the more serious side of preparing foreign drivers on how to tackle our UK road network," explained Licence Bureau’s training and sales manager, Martin Starkey.

He continued: "The mention actually highlighted a pertinent analogy relevant to driver training – like the game Snakes and Ladders. The aim being to continuously climb the ladders to keep safety high on the agenda, whilst avoiding the snakes and allowing standards to slip." 

Licence Bureau’s MyUK is an online foreign driver familiarisation course delivered via Cisco WebEx. The online format allows individuals to access the interactive course from the comfort of their PC, in real time, from all corners of the world.

The two-hour course is designed especially for foreign drivers that are either new to driving in the UK or are currently working for a company based abroad and are about to start working (and driving) in the UK. This is particularly relevant to the increasing number of parcel delivery companies who employ foreign drivers to deliver their goods to homes and businesses.

The course covers topics including: road classification; speed limits; driving and the law; driving etiquette; roundabouts, approaches and signalling; re-fuelling, bus lanes, UK weather and much more.

Importantly the course supports companies who have a responsibility for their employees’ duty of care while they are driving a company vehicle. 

Courses cater for up to 12 delegates at one time and are charged at £39 per driver.

For more information on MyUK or Licence Bureau’s portfolio of driver training courses, contact: Martin Starkey on 07938 379101 or email m.starkey@licencebureau.co.uk.

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Fleets course helps foreign drivers stay safe on UK roads 29/10/2018

Snakes and monkeys proved to be one of the top concerns for a foreign driver set to take to the UK’s roads.

The concern, expressed by a southeast Asia driver, was raised during one of Licence Bureau’s new online training courses for fleets – MyUK – designed to help foreign drivers stay safe on UK roads.

"I couldn’t quite believe what I was hearing when they asked how we manage snakes and monkeys on the roads here in the UK. It certainly raised a smile and provided some light relief from the more serious side of preparing foreign drivers on how to tackle our UK road network," explained Licence Bureau’s training and sales manager, Martin Starkey.

He continued: "The mention actually highlighted a pertinent analogy relevant to driver training – like the game Snakes and Ladders. The aim being to continuously climb the ladders to keep safety high on the agenda, whilst avoiding the snakes and allowing standards to slip." 

Licence Bureau’s MyUK is an online foreign driver familiarisation course delivered via Cisco WebEx. The online format allows individuals to access the interactive course from the comfort of their PC, in real time, from all corners of the world.

The two-hour course is designed especially for foreign drivers that are either new to driving in the UK or are currently working for a company based abroad and are about to start working (and driving) in the UK. This is particularly relevant to the increasing number of parcel delivery companies who employ foreign drivers to deliver their goods to homes and businesses.

The course covers topics including: road classification; speed limits; driving and the law; driving etiquette; roundabouts, approaches and signalling; re-fuelling, bus lanes, UK weather and much more.

Importantly the course supports companies who have a responsibility for their employees’ duty of care while they are driving a company vehicle. 

Courses cater for up to 12 delegates at one time and are charged at £39 per driver.

For more information on MyUK or Licence Bureau’s portfolio of driver training courses, contact: Martin Starkey on 07938 379101 or email m.starkey@licencebureau.co.uk.

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Three millionth licence 16/03/2018

Licence Bureau is celebrating checking its three millionth licence as fleet compliance raises its profile on the corporate agenda.

According to DVLA data Licence Bureau’s volume of licence checks moved from two million to three million checks between June 2016 and February 2018 (20 months). Its previous growth from one to two million checks took 35 months and its first million a decade.

A reduction in licence checking fees, the introduction of convictions online and multi checks per employee have all helped fuel the growth.

The biggest contributor is the imminent arrival of new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation on 25 May. Its requirement to ensure consent, enables employees to access their own data and retention of data means outsourcing this process is much more cost effective.

“A combination of legislation and education has meant compliance is now higher on company agendas of all sizes than ever before,” explained Malcolm Maycock, Licence Bureau’s managing director.

Licence Bureau has also appointed Adele Batsford as its first ever full-time compliance manager who is working with clients to resolve issues around GDPR, as well as helping create new contracts, processes and procedures aligned with its ISO27001 procedures.

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The implications of not frequently checking driving licences 03/11/2016

Malcolm Maycock, managing director of Licence Bureau explains the implications of not frequently checking driving licences.

Fleets should take a proactive approach to regularly checking the licences of employees, to assess whether they remain suitable to drive on company business and ensure they are adhering to Duty of Care obligations.

With some uncertainty in companies on who uses their car to drive on company business, it’s more vital than ever to check the licences of all employees.

Licence Bureau recommends, in-line with the Traffic Commissioners that licence checks are carried out at three-monthly intervals in order for drivers to remain compliant, allowing employers to build the most up-to-date digital picture of employees. Organisations such as the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme and Freight Transport Association recommend checks every six months and additional checks for high risk drivers.

Companies must remember that it’s not only staff that drive company vehicles as the main part of their job that need to be checked. Other employees who may use their own vehicle to perform any job-related tasks – known as grey fleet drivers – no matter how big or small, must be checked.

There could be serious implications for the company if a driver – who could have convictions, endorsements or a disqualification against their licence – is involved in an incident, and it can be proved they are driving on business.

With HGV and motorcycle drivers holding various entitlements, frequent licence checks are crucial to build a larger overall compliance profile of the driver. This could include any changes to medical conditions that could affect an employee’s ability to drive.

Real-time licence checking also allows fleets to obtain a bigger picture of any points, endorsements or a disqualification that a driver may hold against their licence. With the speed that licences are updated by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), it’s vital to know from one day to the next that your driver is still legally able to operate the vehicle on company business, giving complete peace of mind and full compliance with employment contracts and insurance.

Failure to enforce this could result in substantial legal, reputational and financial repercussions should a driver on your fleet be involved in an incident. The process of dealing with those drivers whose licences require urgent attention and the sheer number of drivers operating illegally in the UK should encourage businesses to keep the most up-to-date information available for their drivers.

Frequent licence checking should serve as part of a company’s overall risk assessment, laid out by the Health and Safety Executive. Under The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, employers should be identifying the hazards that a driver could pose, and regularly reviewing their work-related risk assessment.

An employee’s overall driving history needs to be checked, both at the time of employment and frequently throughout their tenure.

When checking an employee’s licence, any system needs to be compliant with the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. This emphasises the need for thoroughly checking the licences of current staff, and when employing new employees who will be driving on company business.

Should an employer not schedule regular assessments, they have no way of knowing whether their drivers’ have previously committed an offence since the last check, which could compromise the company’s vehicle insurance policy.

This is especially important for those with the most serious convictions that will become spent after five years. These offences typically involve driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or causing death by dangerous driving.

The driving licence is now only a starting point; fleets should ensure drivers are fit and healthy and not impaired by any prescribed drugs or medical conditions, even for a short time.

Licence holders have a legal obligation to notify their employer, and the DVLA of any impediment to their health, that would prevent them from driving, or from carrying out their job to the required standard.

However, relying solely on the driver to notify their employer of such a condition is risky. Regardless of severity of the health issue, this could allow an unfit driver to get behind the wheel and in some cases, operate specialist equipment. This could leave employers liable to prosecution should an incident occur.

Regular checks and encouraging drivers to inform their employers of any changes to their health, that may affect their ability to carry out their duties, is the only way to ensure that risk in this area is mitigated. However, this requires the ability for fitness-to-drive information gathered from third-parties, to be acted on by the DVLA, whether this is from doctors or Police.

The time and resources required for fleets to establish licence checking, especially when carrying out checks internally, is no excuse not to regularly assess the ability for employees to drive on company business.

Although internal checking and re-checking of driving licences can prove initially time consuming, the consequences could prove irreversible should an employee, who has not disclosed all aspects of their driving licence, be involved in an accident.

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Outstanding commitment to road safety 03/11/2016

Licence Bureau managing director Malcolm Maycock has received the prestigious Kevin Storey Award for Outstanding Commitment to Road Safety at Brake’s annual Fleet Safety Awards.

Held at the Birmingham Hilton Metropole, Malcolm was recognised for his relentless contribution to improving road safety at the Metropolitan Police, Licence Bureau, and as chairman of the Association of Driving Licence Verification (ADLV), not to mention his extensive personal efforts as a Brake volunteer and speaker.

Malcolm formed Licence Bureau in 2003 as the first UK company to provide a B2B solution to driving licence management, following tireless work to establish regular licence checking for employees with the DVLA and Information Commissioner.

Recognising the need to provide an all in one solution, Malcolm has steered Licence Bureau into a full compliance management company, instilling a culture of road safety in businesses that has led to over two million licence checks being carried out since it was established. The fleet compliance company was also nominated in the Road Safety in the Community Award category for the second year running.

Skanska’s Alison Moriarty received the Road Risk Manager of the Year Award, sponsored by Licence Bureau, for the second year running, thanks to her continued efforts to minimise road risk and shape driver behaviour at the construction company.

Malcolm said: “I’m honoured to be recognised by Brake with the Kevin Storey award. I’ve always been passionate about making a difference on the roads throughout my entire adult life; to receive this accolade is truly humbling.” 

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Fleets should take a proactive approach to regularly checking the licences of employees, to assess whether they remain suitable to drive on company business and ensure they are adhering to their Dutys 02/11/2016

Fleets should take a proactive approach to regularly checking the licences of employees warns Licence Bureau.

The company says this is necessary to assess whether they remain suitable to drive on company business and ensure they are adhering to their Duty of Care obligations.

Malcolm Maycock, managing director at Licence Bureau, said: "With some uncertainty in companies over who uses their car to drive on company business, it’s more vital than ever to check the licences of all employees. Licence Bureau recommends, in line with the Traffic Commissioners, that licence checks are carried out at three-monthly intervals in order for drivers to remain compliant, allowing employers to build the most up-to-date digital picture of employees. Organisations such as the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme and Freight Transport Association recommend checks every six months and additional checks for high-risk drivers.
This enables fleets to continually assess a driver’s overall health at regular intervals, something which was displayed on the paper counterpart driving licence, albeit amended less-frequently."

To read the full article go to www.hsmsearch.com

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Licence Bureau keeps Meachers safe 21/09/2016

UK independent freight and logistics provider Meachers Global Logistics has appointed Licence Bureau to carry out licence checking of its employees across the country.

The Hemel Hempstead-based compliance management company has rolled out its award-winning Compliance Managed Services (CMS) portal to Meachers’ 130 employees, which operates 65 trucks from depots in Southampton and Derby.
 
The drivers will have their licences checked at pre-determined times throughout the year, allowing Meachers operational managers to monitor whether there are any changes to a driver’s entitlement to drive.
 
This is crucial to ensure drivers safely transport the priceless freight they’ve been entrusted to carry across the country, to customers, national airports and docks for onward movement, while also taking proactive steps to keep other road users safe when operating heavily laden vehicles.
 
Licence Bureau’s CMS system proactively alerts the Meachers management team to critical risk factors such as drivers holding a licence which has recently become invalid, one that has received numerous endorsements or is about to expire, with particular emphasis on their Category C+E entitlement.
 
Using Licence Bureau’s system also allows Meachers to proactively manage their grey fleet drivers by checking the licences of all employees, not only those who directly operate their vehicles.
 
“With drivers operating in all four corners of the country making it difficult for Meachers to ensure that everyone remains compliant, our automated alerts system efficiently manages selected risk parameters for each driver, allowing them to fulfil their Duty of Care obligations,” says Malcolm Maycock, Managing Director of Licence Bureau.
 
“Licence Bureau’s portal is the perfect tool for ensuring all of Meachers’ drivers are safe to operate our heavy goods vehicles and equipment. Market-leading systems and dedicated client support made it an easy choice to work with Licence Bureau, allowing us to concentrate fully on delivering freight to our partners, safely and on time,” added Gary Whittle, Commercial Director of Meachers Global Logistics.

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A wake up call for fleets 06/04/2016

Malcolm Maycock, managing director of Licence Bureau, warns that the new guidelines for sentences imposed on companies for health and safety offences in the workplace should serve as a serious wake up call for companies operating company vehicles.

From February 1, tougher sentences were introduced for businesses that have breached health and safety regulations resulting in serious injury or death. The move is aimed at influencing companies who do not prioritise high standards of health and safety throughout their organisation.

These will see companies handed tougher financial penalties, graded on company size, turnover, culpability and the level of harm caused to the victim(s). Individuals should also be reminded of the fines and jail sentences they could face should they contravene any health and safety regulations under Section 33 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

The leading independent compliance management provider is urging fleets and their drivers to fully understand the new guidelines, in order to mitigate risk of serious prosecution for a company or driver should an incident occur.

The new guidelines consider a range of factors for sentencing companies that have breached regulations, including turnover, the harm caused to victims, level of risk and culpability involved. For example, a company with an annual turnover of no more than £2million could face a fine of £450,000, should a disregard for legislation result in death. For individuals, a similar breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 could result in a maximum prison term of two years.

These guidelines are especially important for operator licence holders. Breaching health and safety regulations that result in fines or prison terms could lead to licences being refused, leading to further reputational and financial repercussions.

For health and safety best practice, all fleets should be thoroughly investigating any incidents that occur when an employee is driving on business, as if they were making a RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013) report, despite these not being required by the Health and Safety Executive.

The onus is on both employer and employee to ensure health and safety in the workplace is kept to a high standard; both have a moral duty not to place the company or themselves at risk by violating basic rules. However, employers should be reminding drivers that these places of work include using company vehicles on a public road, where they have less direct influence on a driver’s actions.

Use of a mobile phone is a prime example; we have recently seen drivers convicted of death by dangerous driving given lengthy custodial sentences, but their employers seem to be doing little about it.

These revised guidelines should serve as a serious wake-up call for the consequences for companies and individuals should an incident occur.

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New workplace sentencing guidelines a wake-up call for fleets 01/02/2016

New guidelines for sentences imposed on companies for health and safety offences in the workplace, including corporate manslaughter should serve as a serious wake-up call for companies operating company vehicles.

From February 1 2016, tougher sentences will be introduced for businesses that have breached health and safety regulations resulting in serious injury or death. The move is aimed at influencing companies who do not prioritise high standards of health and safety throughout their organisation.

These will see companies handed tougher financial penalties, graded on company size, turnover, culpability and the level of harm caused to the victim(s). Individuals should also be reminded of the fines and jail sentences they could face should they contravene any health and safety regulations under Section 33 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

The leading independent compliance management provider is urging fleets and their drivers to fully understand the new guidelines, in order to mitigate risk of serious prosecution for a company or driver should an incident occur.

The new guidelines consider a range of factors for sentencing companies that have breached regulations, including turnover, the harm caused to victims, level of risk and culpability involved. For example, a company with an annual turnover of no more than £2million could face a fine of £450,000, should a disregard for legislation result in death. For individuals, a similar breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 could result in a maximum prison term of two years.

These guidelines are especially important for Operator Licence Holders. Breaching health and safety regulations that result in fines or prison terms could lead to licences being refused, leading to further reputational and financial repercussions.

For health and safety best practice, all fleets should be thoroughly investigating any incidents that occur when an employee is driving on business, as if they were making a RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013) report, despite these not being required by the Health and Safety Executive.

The onus is on both employer and employee to ensure health and safety in the workplace is kept to a high standard; both have a moral duty not to place the company or themselves at risk by violating basic rules. However, employers should be reminding drivers that these places of work include using company vehicles on a public road, where they have less direct influence on a driver’s actions.

Use of a mobile phone is a prime example; we have recently seen drivers convicted of death by dangerous driving given lengthy custodial sentences, but their employers seem to be doing little about it. These revised guidelines should serve as a serious wake-up call for the consequences for companies and individuals should an incident occur.

Malcolm Maycock, managing director of Licence Bureau

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Driver audit 'essential' 02/12/2015

Fleets are being urged to implement driver audits into their overall licence checking and risk prevention strategy by Licence Bureau, to ensure they are effectively managing driver risk throughout their business.

The independent fleet driving licence checking and compliance company is advising fleets to ensure that both drivers and non-drivers are fully aware of their health and safety responsibilities. All businesses are obliged to guarantee – as much as is reasonably practical – that the health, safety and welfare of employees is properly managed in the workplace, which includes driving on business.

This includes making sure all employees remain compliant and aware of general company policy, including the driving handbook, using a mobile phone at the wheel, fatigue, general wellbeing and eyesight.

Employee audits should also include bespoke questions for any specific equipment or vehicles that staff operate. This is crucial for ensuring that any employees with medical conditions, which could affect their ability to carry out their work, is properly managed.

With many fleets employing staff from overseas, the Hemel Hempstead-based company is also reminding fleets not to overlook basic Right to Work checks for employees, to verify their eligibility to work in the UK. This includes the checking of key documents – for all employees – such as driving licences, passports and visas outlining restrictions to the work they can carry out.

“In order to build a proper picture of all staff, Licence Bureau strongly recommends implementing bespoke audits for drivers and non-drivers, plus carrying out Right to Work checks on any necessary employees,” Malcolm Maycock, MD of Licence Bureau, said.

“Without these, organisations could be liable for prosecution under The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006, posing a substantial risk to the business. Failing to recognise any unique circumstances that relate to employees driving on business could pose a substantial risk to a company’s risk prevention strategy”.

 

 

 

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